Category Archives: Science Daily


Oct

22

2017
Women who give birth in winter or spring less likely to have postpartum depression

Women who give birth in winter or spring less likely to have postpartum depression

Women who give birth in winter or spring are less likely than women who deliver in the fall or summer to suffer from postpartum depression (PPD), suggests a study of more than 20,000 women. The study also found that women who delivered babies at a higher gestational age (further along in their pregnancy) were less likely to develop PPD, and women who did not have…

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Oct

19

2017
Itsy bitsy spider: Fear of spiders and snakes is deeply embedded in us

Itsy bitsy spider: Fear of spiders and snakes is deeply embedded in us

Snakes and spiders evoke fear and disgust in many people, even in developed countries where hardly anybody comes into contact with them. Until now, there has been debate about whether this aversion is innate or learnt. Scientists have recently discovered that it is hereditary: Even babies feel stressed when seeing these creatures – long before they could have learnt this reaction.


Oct

19

2017
More teens than ever aren’t getting enough sleep

More teens than ever aren’t getting enough sleep

Researchers found that about 40 percent of adolescents in 2015 slept less than 7 hours a night, which is 58 percent more than in 1991 and 17 percent more than in 2009. They further learned that the more time young people reported spending online, the less sleep they got. Teens who spent 5 hours a day online were 50 percent more likely to not sleep…

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Oct

17

2017
HIV infection, even with antiretroviral therapy, appears to damage a growing child’s brain

HIV infection, even with antiretroviral therapy, appears to damage a growing child’s brain

One of the largest and best-documented trials of children receiving early antiretroviral therapy — the CHER clinical trial in South Africa — finds ongoing white matter damage in HIV-positive children at the age of 7 years. The study aims to contribute to a better understanding of brain development in HIV-infected and exposed children, as well as the impact of long-term antiretroviral treatment.


Oct

12

2017
Baby talk in any language: Shifting the timbre of our voices

Baby talk in any language: Shifting the timbre of our voices

When talking with their young infants, parents instinctively use ‘baby talk,’ a unique form of speech including exaggerated pitch contours and short, repetitive phrases. Now, researchers have found another unique feature of the way mothers talk to their babies: they shift the timbre of their voice in a rather specific way. The findings hold true regardless of a mother’s native language.


Oct

10

2017
Children with ADHD Likely to Have Touch-Processing Abnormalities

Children with ADHD Likely to Have Touch-Processing Abnormalities

Children with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) are likely to also have trouble with touch (tactile) processing. A new study finds that children with ADHD fare worse on several tests of tactile functioning, including reaction time and detecting a weak stimulus on the skin (detection threshold).



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