Category Archives: Science Daily


May

10

2017
How focusing on parent-child relationships can prevent child maltreatment

How focusing on parent-child relationships can prevent child maltreatment

Child abuse and neglect is a widespread and costly problem in the United States. Approximately 3.9 million children were subjects of maltreatment reports to child welfare agencies in 2013. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, child abuse and neglect cost the U.S. $124 billion in 2012. In order to help children facing maltreatment, researchers and clinicians first needed to address the heart…

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May

09

2017
Dad’s involvement with baby early on associated with boost in mental development

Dad’s involvement with baby early on associated with boost in mental development

Fathers who interact more with their children in their first few months of life could have a positive impact on their baby’s cognitive development. In a study, published in the Infant Mental Health Journal, researchers from Imperial College London, King’s College London and Oxford University looked at how fathers interacted with their babies at three months of age and measured the infants’ cognitive development more…

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May

06

2017
Spare the praise — spoil the child

Spare the praise — spoil the child

That is the key finding of research that is being presented today, Friday 5 May 2017, by Sue Westwood from De Montfort University at the British Psychological Society’s Annual Conference in Brighton. Sue Westwood said: “Praising a child is a simple act. Improved behaviour and wellbeing can result simply from ensuring that a child’s positive actions are rewarded with praise and parents are seen to…

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May

04

2017
Surprise communication found between brain regions involved in infant motor control

Surprise communication found between brain regions involved in infant motor control

A newborn’s brain is abuzz with activity. Day and night, it’s processing signals from all over the body, from recognizing the wriggles of the child’s own fingers and toes to the sound of mommy’s or daddy’s voice. Though much of how the infant brain works and develops remains a mystery, University of Iowa researchers say they have uncovered a new mode of communication between two…

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May

04

2017
Three of 48 fetuses exposed to Zika in utero had abnormal fetal MRIs

Three of 48 fetuses exposed to Zika in utero had abnormal fetal MRIs

Fattened up on bites of potatoes, yucca and chicken starting at 4 months, some of the babies wearing sporty clothes and frilly dresses are rolly-polly chubby. As striking as their sizable girth are their heads, beautifully round and fully formed with none of the deep skin folds that corroborate the Zika virus’ devastating ability to halt normal brain expansion as infants develop in utero.


May

04

2017
Alternative treatment approach for neonatal abstinence syndrome may shorten hospital stay

Alternative treatment approach for neonatal abstinence syndrome may shorten hospital stay

New research suggests a revamped, “common sense” approach to treating newborns suffering opioid withdrawal — gauging whether the baby can eat, sleep and be consoled within 10 minutes before administering drugs to wean them off exposure — may safely reduce the length of hospitalization they need. An abstract of the study, “A Novel Approach to Evaluating and Treating Infants with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS),” will…

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May

04

2017
Exposure to racism harms children’s health

Exposure to racism harms children’s health

New research to be presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies 2017 Meeting illustrates the unhealthy effects racism can have on children, with reported exposure to discrimination tied to higher rates of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), anxiety and depression, as well as decreased general health. Authors of the study abstract, “The Detrimental Influence of Racial Discrimination in the United States,” will present their findings…

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May

04

2017
Youth most at risk for violence or mental health issues have increased access to guns

Youth most at risk for violence or mental health issues have increased access to guns

New research found adolescents who reported greatest access to guns — either in their own home or a friend’s – also were among those with higher risk for violent behavior. Researchers discovered additional factors linked with increased firearms access that included past suicide attempts and self-reported mental health disorder diagnoses.


May

04

2017
Reading with children starting in infancy gives lasting literacy boost

Reading with children starting in infancy gives lasting literacy boost

New research at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting shows that reading books with a child beginning in early infancy can boost vocabulary and reading skills four years later, before the start of elementary school. The abstract, “Early Reading Matters: Long-term Impacts of Shared Bookreading with Infants and Toddlers on Language and Literacy Outcomes,” will be presented on Monday, May 8, at the Moscone West…

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May

04

2017
Handheld screen time linked with speech delays in young children

Handheld screen time linked with speech delays in young children

As the number of smart phones, tablets, electronic games and other handheld screens in U.S. homes continues to grow, some children begin using these devices before beginning to talk. New research being presented at the 2017 Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting suggests these children may be at higher risk for speech delays. Researchers will present the abstract, “Is handheld screen time use associated with language delay…

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