Category Archives: Science Daily


Feb

21

2017
Students more likely to succeed if teachers have positive perceptions of parents

Students more likely to succeed if teachers have positive perceptions of parents

Parental involvement is commonly viewed as vital to student academic success by most education experts and researchers; however, the quality of research on how to measure and improve parental involvement is lacking. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that teacher ratings of parental involvement early in a child’s academic career can accurately predict the child’s academic and social success. Additionally, they found…

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Feb

21

2017
New behavioral therapy to support Japanese mothers of children with ADHD

New behavioral therapy to support Japanese mothers of children with ADHD

OIST researchers have successfully adapted a parent-training program for ADHD for use with families in Japan, where ADHD-specific behavioral interventions are limited. The results of the proof-of-concept of the new program, the “New Forest Parenting Programme-Japan,” published in Japanese Psychological Research, show reductions in children’s ADHD symptoms and improvements in parent-child relationships, suggesting that the parent-training program might prove to be an effective mainstream behavioral…

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Feb

21

2017
Zika may cause miscarriages, thin brain tissue in babies carried to term

Zika may cause miscarriages, thin brain tissue in babies carried to term

Johns Hopkins researchers say that in early pregnancy in mice with complete immune systems, Zika virus can cross the placenta — intended to protect the developing fetus — and appears to lead to a high percentage of miscarriages and to babies born with thin brain tissue and inflammation in brain cells. By administering Zika virus directly into the reproductive tract of pregnant mice that have…

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Feb

21

2017
Teens with PTSD, conduct disorder have difficulty recognizing facial expressions

Teens with PTSD, conduct disorder have difficulty recognizing facial expressions

Adolescents with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are more likely to misidentify sad and angry faces as fearful, while teens with symptoms of conduct disorder tend to interpret sad faces as angry, finds a study by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. “Our findings suggest that exposure to stress and trauma can have acute emotional impacts that simply translate to misidentification of…

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Feb

17

2017
How humans bond: The brain chemistry revealed

How humans bond: The brain chemistry revealed

In new research published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Northeastern University psychology professor Lisa Feldman Barrett found, for the first time, that the neurotransmitter dopamine is involved in human bonding, bringing the brain’s reward system into our understanding of how we form human attachments. The results, based on a study with 19 mother-infant pairs, have important implications for therapies…

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Feb

17

2017
How dads bond with toddlers: Brain scans link oxytocin to paternal nurturing

How dads bond with toddlers: Brain scans link oxytocin to paternal nurturing

Fathers given boosts of the hormone oxytocin show increased activity in brain regions associated with reward and empathy when viewing photos of their toddlers, an Emory University study finds. “Our findings add to the evidence that fathers, and not just mothers, undergo hormonal changes that are likely to facilitate increased empathy and motivation to care for their children,” says lead author James Rilling, an Emory…

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Feb

17

2017
Mothers and infants connect through song

Mothers and infants connect through song

As one of the first records of human music, infant-directed singing permeates cultural boundaries and parenting traditions. Unlike other forms of caregiving, the act of mothers singing to infants is a universal behavior that seemingly withstands the test of time. On the surface, the exchange between mother and child may seem standard, but to Shannon de l’Etoile, professor of Music Therapy and associate dean of…

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Feb

16

2017
More extremely preterm babies survive, live without neurological impairment

More extremely preterm babies survive, live without neurological impairment

Babies born at just 22 to 24 weeks of pregnancy continue to have sobering outlooks — only about 1 in 3 survive. But according to a new study led by Duke Health and appearing Feb. 16 in the New England Journal of Medicine, those rates are showing small but measurable improvement. Compared to extremely preterm babies born a decade earlier, the study found a larger…

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Feb

16

2017
Brain differences in ADHD

Brain differences in ADHD

Largest imaging study of ADHD to date identifies differences in five regions of the brain, with greatest differences seen in children rather than adults. Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with the delayed development of five brain regions and should be considered a brain disorder, according to a study published in The Lancet Psychiatry. The study is the largest to look at the brain volumes…

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