Category Archives: Science Daily


May

31

2017
Largest study to date finds autism alone does not increase risk of violent offending

Largest study to date finds autism alone does not increase risk of violent offending

A diagnosis of autism alone does not increase the risk of violent offending suggests a study published in the June 2017 issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (JAACAP). The study analysed data from 295,734 individuals in Stockholm County, Sweden, of whom 5,739 had a diagnosis of autism. The researchers tracked these individuals for violent crime convictions between ages…

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May

31

2017
Take control to become a better parent

Take control to become a better parent

Most parents will agree that children present a never-ending series of behavioral challenges. Tantrums, picky eating and poor sleeping behavior are often cited as the more stressful part of raising a child. How parents deal with these challenges determines a child’s physical, psychological and emotional development. But could something as simple as your outlook on life determine how you deal with and overcome these parenting…

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May

30

2017
Mobile technology and child and adolescent development

Mobile technology and child and adolescent development

A new special section of Child Development shows how particularly diverse the use of mobile technology is among children and adolescents, and points to great complexity in the effects of that usage. This special section of Child Development, edited by Dr. Zheng Yan and Dr. Lennart Hardell, adds important information to the research in this area. It includes articles from national and international scholars on…

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May

29

2017
Too much stress for the mother affects the baby through amniotic fluid

Too much stress for the mother affects the baby through amniotic fluid

If the mother is stressed over a longer period of time during pregnancy, the concentration of stress hormones in amniotic fluid rises, as proven by an interdisciplinary team of researchers from the University of Zurich. Short-term stress situations, however, do not seem to have an unfavorable effect on the development of the fetus. The feeling of constantly being on edge, always having to take care…

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May

25

2017
IVF babies do not have lower cognitive skills than naturally conceived children

IVF babies do not have lower cognitive skills than naturally conceived children

Researchers analysed data of hundreds of UK children who had been born through IVF or ICSI (when the man has a low sperm count), testing the same groups of children every few years up to the age of 11. They found a positive association between artificial conception and cognitive development when a child was between the ages of three and five. The study published in…

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May

25

2017
Marmoset monkeys learn to call the same way human infants learn to babble

Marmoset monkeys learn to call the same way human infants learn to babble

A baby’s babbles start to sound like speech more quickly if they get frequent vocal feedback from adults. Princeton University researchers have found the same type of feedback speeds the vocal development of infant marmoset monkeys, in the first evidence of such learning in nonhuman primates, researchers report in Current Biology on May 25. “We wanted to find out whether the idea that monkeys don’t…

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May

25

2017
Fathers’ brains respond differently to daughters than sons

Fathers’ brains respond differently to daughters than sons

Fathers with toddler daughters are more attentive and responsive to those daughters’ needs than fathers with toddler sons are to the needs of those sons, according to brain scans and recordings of the parents’ daily interactions with their kids. Fathers of toddlers also sang more often to their daughters and spoke more openly about emotions, including sadness, possibly because they are more accepting of girls’…

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May

24

2017
Parent training on ADHD using volunteers can help meet growing treatment needs

Parent training on ADHD using volunteers can help meet growing treatment needs

Using volunteers to train parents concerned about attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in their children can improve capacity to meet increasing ADHD treatment needs, finds a new study by NYU’s Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. The study, published in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, highlights an innovative approach to embracing community resources — tapping volunteers to act as therapists. “Given the prevalence…

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May

24

2017
Mindfulness-focused childbirth education leads to less depression

Mindfulness-focused childbirth education leads to less depression

Mindfulness may be good for new moms. A study this month from researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) shows mindfulness training that addresses fear and pain during childbirth can improve women’s childbirth experiences and reduce their depression symptoms during pregnancy and the early postpartum period. “Fear of the unknown affects us all, and perhaps none more so…

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May

24

2017
Can parents’ tech obsessions contribute to a child’s bad behavior?

Can parents’ tech obsessions contribute to a child’s bad behavior?

Fatigue. Hunger. Boredom. Those are often on the list of reasons parents mention if their child whines, has tantrums or acts out. Researchers are now asking if such negative behaviors could be related to something else: parents spending too much time on their smartphones or tablets. A small study from University of Michigan C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital and Illinois State University found that heavy digital…

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